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Springs Break

Some like it hot.

by Corey Hockett

Soaking in hot springs, aka “hot-potting,” is a universal and timeless pleasure. Nothing beats the sensation of slipping into slightly stinging water, only to feel comfy and tranquil seconds later. Whether you’ve had a great day on the slopes, been in the library too long, or just have an afternoon off, these are the spots in which to soak your bones.

Lap of Luxury
For those into a well-developed, plush backdrop, check out these commercial pools for a luxurious soak.

Bozeman Hot Springs
Status: Developed
Access: Open to the public
Admission: $8.50
Location: 8 miles west of Bozeman

Courtesy_Boz-hot-springs2This massive facility recently underwent renovation and now has nine pools, both inside and out. It has wet and dry saunas, a fitness center, and campground. If you’re coming back from Big Sky or don’t want to travel far, this is your place.

 

Chico Hot Springs
Status: Developed
Access: Open to the public as well as to registered guests
Admission: $7.50 for adults; less for kids. Guests soak free
Location: 22 miles south of Livingston

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Located in Paradise Valley, just south of Livingston, Chico provides two refreshing pools and an assortment of accommodation options for overnighters. Check it out if your family is in town or you’re looking for a romantic weekend getaway.

Norris Hot Springs
Status: Developed
Access: Open to the public
Admission: $7 for adults; reduced for kids and seniors
Location: 35 miles west of Bozeman

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This 30’ x 40’ pool is a collection of geothermal springs located near the Madison River. Dubbed “Water of the Gods” by the current owner, Norris has live music every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Added bonus: be the DD and get in for free.

 

Simple Soaking
If you’re the less-is-more type, or prefer nature to civilization, these are your hot spots.

Boiling River
Status: Primitive
Access: Unrestricted (Yellowstone Park pass required)
Admission: Park pass is $35 for single vehicle
Location: 2 miles south of Gardiner

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Just inside the Gardiner entrance to Yellowstone National Park, scalding channels mingle with the cold river water to form the perfect temperature for soaking—and this set of pools is only a half-mile walk from the parking lot. This gem is a must, but expect crowds.

Potosi Hot Springs
Status: Primitive
Access: Open to the public
Admission: Free
Location: 8 miles west of Pony
Head to Pony and travel southwest on Potosi Rd. / South Willow Creek Rd. Follow the signs to the campground and then venture the mile-long trail back down the creek to the spring. It’s not the warmest pool around, but it’s sized nicely for a group of 6-8.

Renova Hot Springs
Status: Primitive
Access: Open to the public
Admission: Free
Location: 10 miles south of Whitehall
Head south of Whitehall on Hwy. 55, taking the Waterloo turnoff. The road deposits you a quarter-mile from the spring, where you can bathe in rock-lined pools along a side-channel of the Jefferson River. The river mixes with warmer thermal water in two separate hot-water seeps, creating a variety of soaking temperatures. Check the river flow beforehand; at high water, the pools can get washed out.

TKings Exhibit Complete

Museum in the Mountains

Get MOR out of your college experience.

by Mark Robinson

When Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, the super-heated pyroclastic flow of rock and ash that destroyed Pompeii also devastated the opulent villas of some of Rome’s wealthiest citizens at Oplontis. Now all that remains of this seaside community are the artifacts of leisure and luxury.

Leisure & Luxury in the Age of Nero: The Villas of Oplontis Near Pompeii is an exhibit appearing at Montana State University’s Museum of the Rockies (MOR) through December 2016. MOR is one of only three museums in the U.S. to host the artifacts, none of which had ever left Italy before now.

Museum of the Rockies MSU photo by Kelly Gorham.

Like all exhibits at MOR, Oplontis brings the stirring history and unexpected wonders of our world right to the MSU campus. From a 60-million-year-old T. Rex and a working Montana homestead, to Native American culture and a planetarium that propels students into the outer reaches of the universe, the museum is an integral part of the learning experience at MSU. Students, as well as their parents, can participate in programming and lectures that stimulate the desire to learn, open minds to new ways of thinking, and shed new light on their interpretation of the past.

This school year alone, MOR programs and exhibits will allow students to delve deep into the civilization of ancient Rome, examine the heritage of Rocky Mountain peoples, or even to raise a glass of beer while learning about Montana industry—and that only scratches the surface.

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Another vital aspect of the museum is its seamless collaboration with MSU instructors and their coursework. Professors often bring classes to MOR as part of their curriculum, utilizing the museum’s unique resources to enhance student learning and engagement.

MOR offers discounted memberships for just $36 per year, giving students unlimited access to the exhibits, the Living History Farm, the Taylor Planetarium, lectures, programming, and more. The museum is also a part of the Association of Science & Technology Center’s Passport Program, which means members enjoy free admission to over 300 other museums across the country and around the world.

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Nifty & Thrifty

Only got $20 in your pocket?

by Kate Beaudoin

Face it: as much as you may want to strut around in Patagonia and Orvis, your budget demands something a little more… college. Which is where Bozeman’s local discount stores come in—with a little patience, you can score sweet deals on stylish, lightly used apparel and hard goods. Gear isn’t the only thing with huge post-purchase depreciation—many of these stores also have great buys on used furniture, dorm-room décor, and more.

Second Wind Sports
EmmaLight_ThriftStore20120723_4Imagine rack upon rack of top-of-the-line brands, all at significant discount—at Second Wind, this fantasy is reality. Pick up a new touring setup or a classic Coleman campstove, and everything in between, all without breaking the bank. Got a bunch of climbing gear but decided you’d rather fish? This place operates on consignment, so work with them on prices and you’ll be getting an even bigger discount on that almost-new Winston rod.

Sack’s Thrift Store
This local favorite is a nonprofit that helps support the Help Center & the Sexual Assault Counseling Center. With locations in Bozeman and Belgrade, you’ll find a wide selection of clothes, books, jewelry, antiques, and housewares at Sack’s. They’re also an off-campus employer for work-study and volunteer programs at MSU, so you can get credits to help them out. Hone your scavenging skills during half-price Saturday, which is every Saturday in Belgrade and the first Saturday of the month in Bozeman.

Head West
A western resale-clothing store in the heart of Main Street, Head West carries vintage boots, bags, buckles, jackets, dresses, and more. Everything is in good condition (you really can’t tell that most of it was pre-loved), organized, and easy to find. They also carry new inventory, so you get the best of both worlds.

Catwalk
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This store is a local Plato’s Closet—sell your gently used clothes (when they’re accepting; in a college town, they’re nearly always full to the brim with kids seeking extra cash), and pick up great finds on the neatly organized racks. The Cat Walk’s brand-name clothes, shoes, and accessories are always in good condition, and they have a special section with some particularly kooky costumes, so keep your eyes open around Halloween.

Nu2u Thrift
A self-proclaimed “thrift superstore,” Nu2u is more than just catchy text-message shorthand. It’s enormous—full of furniture, décor, and a whole upstairs section dedicated to vintage clothing. It’s the go-to store for new and used costumes with tons of accessories and a wide selection of outfits. If you know what you’re looking for and you have some time on your hands, you’re almost certain to find it here. They also have a huge selection of hunting, camping, and fishing gear.

ReCouture & UFS
EmmaLight_ThriftStore20120723_2For higher-quality items at prices well below retail, head out W. Main, just past 19th. The Used Furniture Store (UFS) has great deals on home furnishings, while ReCouture sells lightly-used clothing, furniture, and more.

 

Habit for Humanity / Restore
Outfitting your nice rental? This is your spot, with household items, beds, couches, cabinets, blenders, toasters etc.

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Modest Maintenance

Tune-up on a tight budget. 

by Ryan Diehl

So you got to school and your gear is in shambles. Your bike needs a tune-up and your skis have core shots galore. Problem is, you’re on a tight budget—does deciding between tuned gear or putting food in your belly sound familiar? Well, now there’s a solution: bring that gear into the ASMSU Outdoor Recreation Program Bike & Ski Workshop and don’t worry about a thing. This service is provided to MSU students at a low cost to help keep your stuff in tip-top shape, so you can go back to skiing powder and ripping singletrack—I mean, studying.

The Bicycle & Ski Workshop, which is located in the Outdoor Recreation Program building, allows MSU students, faculty/staff, and affiliates to perform maintenance and repairs on personal equipment. All current students have access to tools and the facility for a small fee and are welcome to work on their own bikes, skis, or snowboards. Assistance is often available, as well as drop-off services for a reasonable hourly rate.

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You can also purchase essential tools for maintaining a smooth-running bike, or to keep your favorite pair of skis or board in good shape. If mechanics aren’t your specialty, shop attendants are happy to show you the ropes to get you started.

Skiing and biking opportunities abound in the Bozeman area. As an MSU student, you can’t always afford to keep your gear in good working order. So bring it on down to your favorite peer-run shop, feel welcome, and get back to exploring in no time.

For more information, call 994-3621.